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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 55 (some duplicates have been removed)
joins us thousanow all the details. >> as you know, there are two ways to go about deficit reduction under the sequester law passed in 2011. one is the full ten year sequester. that's $1.2 trillion in budget cuts over ten years. the other is to do it piece meal. if do you it just for the rest of of the year, it would just be $85 billion. president obama said if congress can't agree with the full pack annual by march 1st, we need to do something smaller in the name of staving off damage to the economy, to consumer, and to federal workers. here's the president. >> if congress can't act immediately on a bigger package, about they can't get a bigger package done by the time the sequester is scheduled fto go into effect, then i believe they should at least pass a smaller package of spending cuts and tax reforms that would delay the economically damaging effects of the sequester for a few more months until congress finds a way to replace these cuts with a smarter solution. >> now, of course the fundamental barriers separating the two sides on either a short term or long term deal is that p
is happening, it is true that the deficits are going to be below a trillion dollars for the first time in several years. it is true that the new revenues and spending that you did not do -- it is also true the economy is beginning to grow again. this is almost like the reverse of what we did in 1993. i was perfectly well aware that a raise taxes and cut spending, it could have been dragging effect on the economy. but not nearly as much as not nearly as much as having low growth or then having interest rates that were too high. so our gamble was that the explosive effect of lowing interest rates with a booming bond market and having more disposal income over five-10 year period to invest in america's future would more than offset putting the hammer down by raising more money and cutting spending. it turned out to be a good gamble. it will make sense here again. but timing is everything. so i think you should have a budget that does not defy arithmetic and does not follow in the trap that we had for 20 of the last 32 years which is you always get more money when you cut taxes. but it is
the deficit but americans do not support sacrificing real spending cuts for more tax hikes." >>> efforts by the white house to head off spending cuts come as a new government report predicts the budget deficit will drop below $1 trillion for the first time during obama's presidency. the congressional budget office which assumes that the cuts will go into effect march 1st says the government will run a deficit of $845 billion this year. that's compared to $1.1 trillion short fall. the outlook predicts the improvements will not last. it warns that an aging population will drive up retirement spending and rising interest rates will put the debt at unsustainable level it's current laws remain in place, debt by 2023 will equal 77% of gross domestic product. that is roughly double the 39% average seen over the past 40 years. >>> coming off the republicans' bruising defeat, eric cantor is looking to rebrand his party n a speech at a d.c. think tank, he moved away from his combative tone expressing a need to work on issues with president obama important to the nation. >> hour house majority will
about deficits, we are buying in to the right wing mantra somehow deficits are killing the economy. look at great britain and doing with their austerity plans and doesn't add up. i'm much more of the mind to be proactively looking at infrastructure investment like many of the business advisers told president obama should happen. people from commerce, from industry. i get it. that won't happen as long as house republicans are dead set against it. and what we're left with is unfortunately in my view a detente to put the discussion in the frame the republicans want. what about deficits? we have a jobs crisis in this country. not a deficit crisis. to me, the whole conversation has been pushed to the right further than it should be. >> and karen, on a last note, in anticipation of the president's speech, the white house released numbers on the people affected by the cuts. i believe around 600,000, between 600,000 and 800,000 suffering as a result of cuts to food stamps and other program that is people need to survive these days and at least some of the analysis out there, democrats feel that
we're going to get these defense cuts and deficit hawks, conservatives, tea partiers are putting moderate republicans in a bind saying this is cutting our deficit. let's go for it. >> the grand irony, of course, is the fact that the number -- if you poll people their number one issue is jobs, right? it continues to be jobs. and $120 billion austerity crunch, the numbers being bantered around, in exchange for the sequester, which is like $85 billion. whatever it is, right, that's a big chunk. that will have an effect, negative jobs effect, no question. >> it is going to have an effect, i agree with you, chris. here is what i think. i think it is a risk. there will probably be a small recession. we had a .1 decrease in gdp last time. this deficit is a real problem. this is where i depart from paul. who am i to depart from paul? a nobel laureate. >> we'll ask him. >> this is about the best deal we'll get out of the right-winged crazy people in the house. >> because it's balanced and -- >> it doesn't really touch -- there's no better deal progressives are going to get out of this oth
with smarter spending reductions to bring down the deficit. we can do it in a gradual way so that there is less of an impact. these deductions that certain folks can take advantage of, the average person cannot. not everyone has access to cayman island accounts, the average person does not have access to carry interest income, where they wind up paying a much lower rate on the billions that they earned. we want to make sure that the whole system is fair and transparent and that we are reducing our deficit in a way that does not hamper growth and reduce the kinds of strategies that we need in order to make sure that we are creating a strong middle-class. host: jim from south carolina, on the republican line, good morning. caller: how are you? host: well, thank you. caller: you keep mentioning and hearing people talking about pensions, but pensions are just invested the same way that 401k is. stocks and bonds. people with pensions lost money as well. i heard cases where people were not going to get as much money. if someone is manages their 401k, i do not know, it needs to be managed properly and
of americans want sensible policies for this country. they want to us deal with the deficit in a way that provides for the future of this country. so they want to invest in research and education. they want roads and bridges. we're having a tough time breaking through the division that we have in washington. and quite frankly, the more you can do to underscore the importance of the work that you do, i think the stronger the voice will be for a reasonable solution to our fiscal problems that will permit n.i.h. to get the funding it needs on a permanent basis. so i think this point needs to be underscored more and more. the work you do here and the impact it has on our lives. i was talking -- we had a chance to talk about the work being done in infection diseases about trying to develop a way in which we can get a flu shot that is more generic rather than every year. that's extremely exciting to me. i don't like trying to figure out when i'm going to get my flu shot and whether it works or not. the more we talk about what we can achieve in the future, what america can achieve in the fu
'll be following this. >>> to washington now. members of congress remain focused on deficits, spending and how to head off the looming sequestration cuts poised to kick in early next month. in separate interviews on sunday, house minority leader nancy pelosi and majority leader eric cantor laid out the economic dividing lines. >> what we need is growth. we need growth with jobs. and if you have spending cuts, education of our children and other investments like the national institutes of health where you are hindering growth, you're not going to reduce the deficit. so it is almost a false argument to say we have a spending problem. we have a budget deficit problem that we have to address. we think the deficit and the national debt are at immoral levels. we think they must be reduced. we're sick and tired of paying interest on the national debt. and that's 15% -- that's a large percentage of the budget. >> the tax fight for the president means higher taxes, more revenue. again, we can't be raising taxes every three months in this town, david. and you know, the bottom line is we want tax reform,
. do you believe that the tax and deficit debate is harmful to the business environment now? >> the uncertainty is back. the amount of -- the uncertainty is bad. you go from the fiscal cliff to the deficit debate to sequestration. that is inherently disruptive to business investment. certainty is a good multiplier. we are these long cycle businesses that have global competition. i do not have the lecture he to say that i will quit investing for six months until this is resolved. i will keep going. the people who can hurt the worst by all of this are the small and medium businesses. the people that have no buffer. that get confused. these are the people that are the heart of the u.s. economy. they are the ones that are constantly being bombarded as we go from one to another. this can only be solved here. this is one of the few cases where the business roundtable of people speak with one voice. it would be great to get a resolution. >> there is a divide in the corporate side on the corporate tax front. large companies would benefit more from corporate tax reform, especially go
of a man, but he actually tripled the deficit and debt and expanded the size of government to or proportions, the same as george bush and republicans always blamed democrats, even though clinton and obama both have lower the deficit if you look at the treasury's website for every fiscal year. every single republican from nixon to george bush as we expanded the deficit greatly. the congress didn't change. it is just the president, but it's always blamed on congress. whenever credit given, they want all the credit, none of the responsibility. republicans will say divisive things. zero, this birth certificate or you're not american enough for denver. >> guest: three things. as a general matter, members of those party blame the other party. president obama more than any in my lifetime has landed the republican party and generally been whining or can need more excuses than any president. he seemed as if he couldn't give a speech for a while without claiming everything, including athletes foot on george w. bush. that gets tiresome after a while. but the criteria is claiming the o
, he talked about the economy. when it comes to tackling the nation's deficit, president obama said sunday in an interview with cbs news there needs to be revenue involved. and it sounds like he might be interested in going after people like mitt romney. >> there is no doubt we need additional revenue coupled with smart spending reductions in order to bring down our deficit. and we can do it in a gradual way so that it doesn't have a huge impact. and as i said, when you look at some of these deductions that certain folks are able to take advantage of, the average person can't take advantage of them. the average person doesn't have access to cayman island accounts. the average person doesn't have access to carried interest income where they end up paying a much lower rate on billions of dollars that they've earned. so we just want to make sure that the whole system is fair. >> all right. steve, help me out here. i think the democrats are holding a losing hand if they come back and ask for more taxes. they talk about raising tax rates on anybody. but if we're talking about closing loo
are. the question of what's the growing end of the church and how do you address this faith deficit in the historic way of catholicism, the western world, is going to be high on the agenda, it would seem to me, of the cardinals meeting in conclave and in the informal conversations which let's not forget began about six hours ago that will precede the formal meetings before the conclave is closed. >> you've touched on something that ann thompson, you know very well, that there is a sight of this that is political. not in the grungy sense of the word, but in the larnler sense that there are factions, correct, and as you have been covering this in the past with john paul ii and the asinges of benedict xvi, you have a feel for how that work as well. >> well, i think the thing -- the thing for people to understand here, andrea, is that there is a clear difference between what some of the people in the pews want and what the leadership believes in. you know, there's a lot of speculation today. would the new pope consider married priests or women priests or gay marriage or sexual reproduct
feel that same sense of shared responsibility. that is how we will reduce our deficit. that is america built to last. [laughter] -- [applause] i recognize that people watching tonight have differing views about taxes and debt and energy and health care. no matter what party they belong to, i bet most americans are thinking the same thing right about now -- nothing will get done in washington this year. or next year. or the year after that, because washington is broken. can you blame them for feeling all little bit cynical? the greatest blow to our confidence in our economy last year did not come from event beyond our control. it came from a debate in washington over whether the united states would pay its bills or not. who benefited from that fiasco? i talked tonight about the deficit of trust between main street and wall street. but the divide between the city and the rest of the country is at least as bad, and it seems to get worse every year. host: from january of last -- of last year, the president in his state of the union address. some of the same themes it will continue this wee
in the debate of the deficit crisis. a spokesman for john boehner telling "the huffington post," "we can't keep chasing ever-higher washington spending with ever-higher taxes because it diminishes our children and grandchildren's future." does bringing children into the issue at all change the debate? >> well, i mean, state of the unions end up being about a vision, right? where do you want to take the country over the next year and then some. and in particular, i think for the president, it's his second term. at the end of the day, this is about where he wants to leave the country once he leaves office. emphasizing the economy, jobs, is obviously smart because that's the issue that matters most for the country, but it's also smart because that's where i think most people realize we still have work to do. we've done an enormous amount of recovery over the last four years, in particular where we'd been, but obviously, there's more work to be done. the question is, how do you do it? i think that's where i think the president's going to really kind of hone into and really emphasize the fact that w
the deficit. they have to care about practical -- the reason you're so upset is you know it was a good speech. >> he went over to the aei, the number one war center, ths totally neocon. your thoughts. this is hopeless. i thought he'd admit the truth here today. >> it was pa joring to hear some of that -- >> hasn't he been the guy standing behind boehner's back waiting to trip him over because he's been too moderate. >> no question. he's been standing off center stage waiting for his opportunity to become speaker. i thought that there was a lot of practicality in the speech but not any big ideas. i think -- >> it was like sundries and knowings in a drugstore. little items, like telling colleges they got to tell people what employment prospects there are for english majors. what's that about? cantor -- let's take a look. he took a approach that the university education should be more like a vocational school, a school you can learn a trade. he suggested kids be told by colleges what major earn the most money so families make better choices. >> -- college provided prospective students with relia
's come back and talk about it. >> if i am confirmed, a trust deficit between the committee and the cia would be wholly unacceptable to me. i like to think that mikan dore and bluntness will reassure you you will get straight answers from me, maybe not always the ones you like, but you will get answers and they will reflect my honest views. >> senator, you've been one of the most high-profile critics of the administration for not giving as much information particularly the legal documentation underpinning the targeting of u.s. citizens. is there a current trust deficit between the senate intelligence committee and the administration, and can someone like john brennan heal it or not? >> he did move in the right direction in a number of areas. i was very pleased when he said that if a mistake was made on a targeted killing matter, he'd make a public acknowledgement, something like that. i think he did take some steps in the right direction and the president did as well when he called on wednesday night and said he would reverse course and make additional materials available with respect t
this debt problem. [applause] if you look at what is happening here, it is true that the deficit are going to be below $1 trillion for the first time in several years. and it is true that the new revenues raised in spending that you did not do. it is true that the economy is beginning to grow again. but this is almost like the reverse of what we did in 1993. that is, i was prickly well aware if we raise taxes and cut spending, it could have a dragging effect in the economy. but not nearly as much as spending 40% of the budget paying interest on the debt. not nearly as much as having low growth. at nearly as much as having interest rates that were too high. so our gamble was that the explosive the fact of lowering interest rates, with a booming bond market and having more disposable income over a 5 =-10 year period would more than offset putting the hammer down by raising more money and cutting spending. it turned out to be a good gamble, but it made sense. it will make sense here again. but timing is everything. and so, i think he should have a budget that does not defy our arithmetic but
appropriations committee yesterday we learned that we're actually making progress in getting the budget deficit to shrink below a trillion dollars. which you have saluted as good news. >> you know, a lot of people forget what president bill clinton did. if we would have just continued what he did back when he left office, we would have been -- we had a surplus. we wouldn't be in this situation. but bottom line is the deficit is i believe it is the lowest in some time in 2008. we ought to be celebrating we're actually moving the target down. it is moving down instead of going up. but nobody has picked up. i'm glad she picked that up. bill and victoria, thank you for telling the listeners that president obama and all of us working together, we're actually bringing down the deficit. >> bill: the deficit's going down and the market the dow is going up. so there is some good economic news that you never hear about except here on the "full court press." congressman henry cuellar great to have you with us this morning. >> thank you, bill and victoria. >> bill: we'll be back to continue our conversatio
to the deficit crisis. republican senator mitch mcconnell says that he know that sequestration would have consequences, but he blames president obama for not putting forward an acceptable plan to prevent it. for more on that, jonathan strong, staff writer, role call, alexander burns and national political reporter with politico. good afternoon to both of you. >> hello. >> outgoing defense secretary leon panetta warned that the $85 billion in cuts would curtail american naval operations by a full third and could force furloughs of as many as 800,000 civilian workers. take a listen to what he said. >> it is difficult to believe, frankly, that congress would simply stand aside. stand aside, fail to make the decisions necessary to resolve this crisis and allow the defense economy, equality of life of america to be irreparably damaged. >> how damaging would these cuts be to our national security? >> it's a great question. the impact is going to be fairly dramatic to some of the employees, civilian employees of the pentagon and some other places. the 85 billion in cuts is through the rest of th
additional revenue coupled with smart spending reductions in order to bring down our deficit. and we can do it in a gradual way so it doesn't have a huge impact. >> the republican leadership saying flatly, no more tax hikes. >> so they're all dug in again on the fiscal issues. if you look at the polls, wolf, the public wants the president and congress to tackle those fiscal issues. ironically, they may be closer on gun control. they may be closer on immigration reform. but it's still the fiscal issues that are the real problem. >> in the next few week, they have some major things coming up on those issues. dan pfeiffer, the president's senior adviser, will join us in the next hour to discuss guns, guns and guns. >>> the nation's new secretary of state's wasting no time getting down to business. john kerry spent a busy weekend on the phone with palestinian and israeli leader, plus officials in japan, south korea and turkey. all that was before he officially said hello to the state department staff today. >> here's the big question before the country and the world and the state department aft
in order to bring down our deficit. if you combine those things together we cannot only reduce our deficit but we can invest in education and research and development that will help us grow. martha: what do you think about that at home and what does karl rove think about that. former senior adviser to president george w. bush. there was a lot in that sound bite. we know the tax hikes have kicked in, but the president is suggesting that we need more money from the american people essentially. >> we have a spending problem not a revenue problem. revenues this year are anticipated to be above the year they were in fiscal '08. they are going to be over $2.9 trillion over $2 trillion. spending has increased more rapidly than revenues. the tax revenues we got as a result of raising the rates on the top two brackets was eaten up about it congress in one spending bill proposed about it administration, the sandy relief measure. we have a spending problem and it's going to get worse. martha: during the campaign we heard from governor romney about changing the structure of the tax code long term inst
to trim the deficit instead. but it didn't happen. house republicans point out they've passed the bill to replace the sequester with cuts to federal worker pay, food stamps, and other programs. democrats say that puts the burden on poor and middle-class americans to pay for debt reduction. >> remember, the american people still believe by an overwhelming margin that the rich should contribute to this. >> reporter: but republicans argue democrats have no plan for replacing the sequester beyond eliminating tax breaks from corporate jet owners and oil companies. >> these aren't real solutions, mr. president. they'regimmicks. >> reporter: the sequester was originally supposed to quick in last month, but a last-minute deal between the vice president and senator mcconnell, who you just saw, pushed it off for two months. since then, the will to enact a long-term deal appears, charlie and nora, to have evaporated. >> nancy cordes. >>> meantime, house majority leader eric cantor will be outlining a new agenda for his party today. he'll call on republicans to focus on issues like education and h
political party demands deficit reduction at all costs because those costs will be enormous. that being an editorial. the economic impact of all of this, when we look at that, when does it really trump political fears that this is a real reality? >> it might never trump political fears. have you noticed politicians being so worried about preserving the economy the last couple years? we could hit, and it's worth saying we have not actually come to one of these cliffs or deadlines where we have gone over. we didn't shut down the government in february 2011, didn't breach the debt ceiling in august 2011, didn't go over the fiscal cliff for very long in january of 2012, and we very likely and at least could kick off the debt ceiling for a couple months so far, so so far we haven't actually gone over any of these, nor have we come to permanent solutions. either we'll have to come to permanent solution or eventually sometime, somewhere, we are going to have to go over one of these cliffs because there won't be another option. >> we will let you go. either you have forced all your colleagues t
this regarding eric cantor, who is giving a much-hyped speech regarding the deficit and towards a broader and more inclusive role they can play. he says mr. cantor can apply the existing gop policies. so that, i think at this point in time is a great question for the republican party at least right now. can their response to the 2012 election be to just change the tenor and temperature of their approach to politics rather than the actually policies. can they just stop primarying guys like dick luger without changing the approach to say, inequality. that is the message, changing your hope is different than changing your policies. it is great to have you both here, thank you for joining us. >> great to be here. >> molly, so can they? do they need to do more, need to sort of go back and look at policies or can you actually get pretty far just by changing the way your party acts in public? >> i think the answer is yes. they have to do both. and first of all the republicans find themselves in a situation that the democrats found themselves in maybe a decade ago, where they are on the wrong sid
who can cut the deficit more and the debt, who can trim government but what's an overall economic strategy for investing now while imposing fiscal discipline down the road where it's really needed and that's a case he has an opportunity to make with, you know, with millions of people watching. >> so one of the changes for the second term in the white house is that the president's long-time speech writer favreau is gone and as somebody there on the inside, what that transition is like from one speechwriter to another, what that's like for president obama or for any president and also in terms of what we see and what we hear as voters, as americans, is there going to be a slightly different voice for obama because there's a new speechwriter? >> we don't. it's like a favorite tv show and aaron sorkin left the show. is it going to change now that he's gone or something like that? you know, with president obama as was the case with president clinton and most of these folks, it's their voice and they are deeply involved in the writing of a speech like the state of the union. it's not as
congress can work out a $1 trillion, ten-year deal to reduce the deficit. speaker boehner encouraged bipartisan cooperation. >> this not about being in a hurry. this is about trying to get it right on behalf of the american people and those suffering under an immigration system that doesn't work for anybody. >> the house judiciary committee is holding a hearing this morning on immigration policy. we're back after the break. ♪ to me now? you know the kind of guys that do reverse mortgage commercials? those types are coming on to me all the time now. (vo) she gets the comedians laughing and the thinkers thinking. >>ok, so there's wiggle room in the ten commandments, that's what you're saying. you would rather deal with ahmadinejad than me. >>absolutely. >> and so would mitt romney. (vo) she's joy behar. >>and the best part is that current will let me say anything. what the hell were they thinking? [♪ theme music ♪] >> announcer: ladies and gentlemen, it's the "stephanie miller show"! ♪ i'm walking on sunshine woe ho ♪ ♪ i'm walking on sunshine woe ho ♪
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 55 (some duplicates have been removed)